San José, Costa Rica, since 1956
Donald Trump

PHOTOS: Hundreds turn out for San José Women's March

Hundreds of people packed the streets of San José today for a demonstration of solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington. The U.S. event, which inspired hundreds of “sister marches” across the United States and around the world, was organized to express opposition to positions of newly inaugurated U.S. President Donald Trump.

Organizers indicated before the San José march that partisan messages, including specifically anti-Trump signs or slogans, were discouraged, and that the event’s mission was to promote “peace, inclusion, strengthening the Social Security System (Caja), public employment and a nonreligious state.”

Events took place around Costa Rica, including a barefoot protest on Playa Guiones in Nosara, Guanacaste, early Saturday morning.

Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of London, Paris and other cities worldwide on Saturday. In the United States, march organizers around the country estimated that more than two million people had participated. Final counts were still being evaluated at press time, but organizers had estimated turnouts of more than half a million each in Washington, New York and Los Angeles, and huge gatherings in Boston, Miami, Denver, Seattle and Philadelphia as well.

Donald Trump took office on Friday, Jan. 20.

AFP / Ezequiel Becerra

AFP / Ezequiel Becerra

AFP / Ezequiel Becerra

AFP / Ezequiel Becerra

Check out The Tico Times’ story on this morning’s march in Nosara.

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LolaBleu

Please take your political mumbo-jumbo somewhere else!!!
Most americans living in Costa Rica don’t respect our culture, language, not even our laws.
I’ve been back in my country for almost 5 years and I was surprised to find out gringos and gringas behave very “Trumpship” like in here.
My opinion, most of you people have it in your DNA to be prejudice, nasty, rude, ignorant, etc…..
And let’s not talk about following our laws!!( You want names and addresses?, I have them).
Equality, respect, and understanding should be worn every day every where!!! Not only when they suit you!!!

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PeaceMaker

Lolableu, I am sorry to hear that we Americans do not always follow your laws. Where we come from it is a citizens responsibility to know and follow the law. I will make an effort to learn more about Costa Rican laws so I can be a better guest of your beautiful country and people. To be fair, may I ask about your traffic laws in Costa Rica? Where can I learn more?

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john adamason

Its strange because in the time I lived in Costa Rica, I found the majority of Tico “men” to be the most ignorant, arrogant , inconsiderate, disrespectful people Ive ever met. However, being that you clearly have such nationalistic and even racist attitudes towards gringos (in there DNA? Really? that’s almost, dare I say, Nazism), perhaps you should do what were doing, and build a Wall to keep us out. And to be fare I did find a large percentage of the Americans living in Costa Rica too be doosh bags, but that’s because your country offers what doosh bags want, prostitutes, drugs, and the ability to feel superior to the local population. The American people in America, are still by and large, the hardest working, most generous country on the planet, and if it wasn’t for Americas generosity to your little banana republic, you would fighting for jobs picking coffee beans with the nicas.

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Sylvester Wade

Trump is our President!!! If you Costarrican women, which I am one of you, do not like it… Then do something for your country and get your nose out of the US citizens business… When we were here losing our jobs, our homes, our savings… where were you? What kind of help did you give us? PLEASE… DO NOT SPEAK FOR ALL WOMEN. If you ignore who Trump is because you listen to fake news only.. its your problem. Millions of Latinos voted for Trump… We love HIM!!! We need our jobs back we have gone through a lot under Obama and you women never protested to help us… DO NOT SPEAK FOR US NOW. and furthermore we do not need your support.

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Ken Morris

One of my reservations about these women’s marches held around the world on Saturday was that their focus might have been too broad to make any point well. Boy do we see that reservation verified in this article and then in the comments! Every complaint and accusation is thrown into the mix.

I am though pleased that the marches happened and the turnout was so large. Cutting through it, they were all kind of sparked by objections to Trump’s election, and that’s a pretty big statement, even if it is way too vague.

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María Vanessa Naranjo Amoretti

Portal Víctimas de Maltrato Abuso y
Hostigamiento Sexual
“Portal de Comunicación para las Víctimas de Maltrato Abuso y Hostigamiento Sexual”

“Líneas Telefónicas Dónde Puede Conseguir Ayuda
Costa Rica

Código Telefónico de Emergencia con Asistencia Integrada – Código 911
Las líneas telefónicas 9-1-1 y la 800-300-3000 “Rompamos el Silencio” (es un servicio habilitado por el INAMU), atienden a personas que viven situaciones de violencia y remiten a quienes lo necesitan a los Centros Especializados de Atención y de Albergue Temporal para Mujeres Afectadas por la Violencia Intrafamiliar, sus Hijos e Hijas (CEAAM). Las mujeres afectadas pueden consultar con abogadas, psicólogas y trabajadoras sociales, para recibir el apoyo y la orientación necesarias para enfrentar su caso, a través de la Delegación de la Mujer. Es una instancia (del INAMU) especializada en brindar atención a mujeres víctimas de violencia intrafamiliar. La Delegación está ubicada en el Barrio La California, San José, 150 metros al este y 75 al sur de la Embajada de Nicaragua. Atiende de lunes a viernes, en un horario de 8:00 a.m. a 3:30 p.m. Tels.: (506) 255-1368 / 233-7895. Fax: (506) 221-2478″

http://victimasportal.org/Paises/CostaRica.html

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María Vanessa Naranjo Amoretti

Food for the mind: Great information to read up for women and men around the world and in Costa Rica, especially young adult women and men:

“UN WOMEN
Global Database on Violence against Women”
Costa Rica
http://evaw-global-database.unwomen.org/en/countries/americas/costa-rica

Costa Rica Search Data 1 – 3 OF 3 RESULTS
Download All
Book: Salud Mental Y Violencia Intrafamiliar (“Mental Health And Domestic Violence”)
Costa Rica | 2004
Type of Measure : Health > Training, Education > Formal education
Form of Violence : Domestic violence/Intimate partner violence, Violence against women and girls
Research Projects To Improve Services For Women Victim Of Domestic Violence
Costa Rica | 2004 | 2005
Type of Measure : Education > Formal education, Monitoring and Evaluation > Services
Form of Violence : Domestic violence/Intimate partner violence, Violence against women and girls
Book: Mujeres Contra La Violencia (“Women Against Violence”)
Costa Rica | 2003
Type of Measure : Research and statistical data > Other research and statistical data, Education > Formal education
Form of Violence : Violence against women and girls

Costa Rica Search Data 1 – 7 OF 7 RESULTS
Download All
Investigation On The Access Of Women To Criminal Justice System
Costa Rica | 2012
Type of Measure : Research and statistical data > Other research and statistical data
Form of Violence : Femicide/Feminicide, Trafficking, Violence against women and girls
Sistema De Indicadores Estadísticos De Género
Costa Rica | 2008
Type of Measure : Institutional mechanisms, Research and statistical data > Other research and statistical data
Form of Violence : Violence against women and girls
Book: Mujeres Contra La Violencia (“Women Against Violence”)
Costa Rica | 2003
Type of Measure : Research and statistical data > Other research and statistical data, Education > Formal education
Form of Violence : Violence against women and girls
Survery Assessing The Country’s Needs In Terms Of Domestic Violence
Costa Rica | 1994 | 1996
Type of Measure : Research and statistical data > Other research and statistical data
Form of Violence : Domestic violence/Intimate partner violence
Informe Sobre El Estado De Los Derechos De Las Mujeres
Costa Rica
Type of Measure : Research and statistical data > Other research and statistical data
Form of Violence : Violence against women and girls
Sistema Unificado De Medición Estadística De La Violencia De Género (SUMEVIG)
Costa Rica
Type of Measure : Institutional mechanisms, Research and statistical data > Other research and statistical data
Form of Violence : Violence against women and girls
El Sistema De Indicador De La Política Nacional Para La Igualdad Y Equidad De Género (SIPIEG)
Costa Rica
Type of Measure : Institutional mechanisms, Research and statistical data > Other research and statistical data
Form of Violence : Violence against women and girls

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Isabella Rocha

Lolableu, I do understand your frustration! , but I’ve always remaind my fellow Costarricans that there is a difference between Gringos (as) and Americans. I’ve witness myself many things in Costa Rica done buy Gringos that goes against everything our country stands for, but local officials look the other way, in many cases because they got paid to do that, or they’re directly benefiting themselves in the deal, so I blame also the corrupt Costarrican politicians, city officials, etc., that regardless of the harm they’re doing to our Country, environment or their fellow Costarricans participate in the many shady deals throughout the Country. To be fair is not only Gringos doing it, people from other countries too, Mexicans for example are very heavily involved in the same thing, but since the Gringos have more $$$ they get away with it more and because there’s almost 100,000 of them in Costa Rica now (gasp), is more noticeable. I’m not defending these corrupt Gringos who make it look bad for the many ( and I believe the majority) of Americans that are loving, caring, respectful, and many other wonderful qualities. “One rotten apple spoils the whole basket”, the Americans who see, know, and witness things that make the whole Community look bad should speak up and turn in the “ugly American” kind of fellow Countrymen before this resentment grows. I’m married to a wonderful American man, and he has calls them off every time he sees something as he says, that makes Americans look like Gringos.

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PeaceMaker

Well said Isabella. I am hopeful that my wife and I are doing a good job of representing Americans. I am sure we have made mistakes, but our goal is to be ‘loving, caring, and respectful’. I am not familiar with some of the things you talk about but hope the good outweighs the bad.

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costarica4me2007

What a disgrace and embarrassment to gringos living here in CR for this idiotic protest march to happen and disrupt a peaceful nation. You should be ashamed, but I doubt anyone there has the mental faculties to realize that.

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Tom Keisler

This will prove to be a big mistake for Costa Rica who must rely on the new President for 8 long years. Just like in the States, a few ruin it for the masses.

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