Government to resume work on border road

February 5, 2013

Costa Rica’s government will spend some ₡650 million ($1.3 million) to repair a 15-kilometer section of Route 1856, a road along Río San Juan and the border with Nicaragua.

Collapsed culverts and ditches are part of the repairs that will be performed by local firm MECO beginning Wednesday. The project is expected to last at least two months.

Public Works and Transport Minister Pedro Castro said on Tuesday that later this week the ministry will sign an executive decree to speed up the hiring process for firms that will participate in the next phase of construction, estimated to last an additional four months.

He also said an audit of the project would be performed by an international agency that would be selected in coming days.

Construction of Route 1856 got underway in 2011, but several corruption cases exposed in 2012 halted the project and prompted the resignation of then-Public Works and Transport Minister Francisco Jiménez, as well as the firing of various National Roadway Council officials.

You may be interested

Of snow, kindness and Northern Lights: a Costa Rican in Manitoba, Canada
Please Send Coffee!
586 views
Please Send Coffee!
586 views

Of snow, kindness and Northern Lights: a Costa Rican in Manitoba, Canada

Gustavo Díaz Cruz - December 14, 2017

My mom named me Gustavo Adolfo. I was born in Puntarenas, next to the sea, but my home was in…

Response to disaster: aid successes, struggles in post-Maria Puerto Rico
Weather
777 views
Weather
777 views

Response to disaster: aid successes, struggles in post-Maria Puerto Rico

John McPhaul - December 13, 2017

As Costa Rica joins many other nations in looking back upon the horrendous 2017 hurricane season, longtime Tico Times contributor…

Looking back at Hurricane Maria: the initial impact
Weather
1880 views
Weather
1880 views

Looking back at Hurricane Maria: the initial impact

John McPhaul - December 12, 2017

As Costa Rica joins many other nations in looking back upon the devastating 2017 hurricane season, longtime Tico Times contributor…