Costa Rica’s inflation registers 4.26 percent in November

December 6, 2012

November registered the highest inflation rate of the year, mainly due to increases in water and electricity rates and bus fares.

The National Statistics and Census Institute (INEC) reported that between January and November, inflation reached 4.26 percent, a higher percentage than that in the same period last year, when it reached  3.79 percent.

According to INEC, the annual variation increased 5.22 percent, while a year ago, it was 4.56 percent.

The study notes that one of the factors that prevented even higher figures in the cost of living was a reduction in fuel prices.

The Costa Rican Central Bank’s target is to close the year with an inflation rate of 4-6 percent.

Of the 292 products and services included in the basic food basket, 56 percent increased in cost in November, 12 percent remained unchanged and the remaining 32 percent decreased.

Goods and services with the biggest increases during 2012 are cigarettes and alcohol (31.5 percent), rent (13.7 percent), education (7.3 percent), transport (6 percent) and health (5 percent).

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