Employment figures could increase to 18 percent in last quarter

September 12, 2012

A study released this week by consulting firm Manpower Group indicates that 23 percent of employers in Costa Rica expect to increase their staffs for the last quarter of this year, while 72 percent expect no changes, and only 5 percent are considering cutting staff.

According to the projections, employment rates for this period would reach 18 percent growth.

Results were based on interviews with 620 employers and show an improvement over previous quarters.

For the first quarter of 2012, 26 percent of employers were considering hiring more workers. The percentage dropped to 20 percent in the second quarter and for the third, only 18 percent said they expected to hire more people.

According to the survey, the provinces of Cartago and Alajuela registered the biggest potential growth in hiring. The most promising sector for job openings is construction, with 22 percent, followed by transport and communications, where employers estimated to increase hiring by up to 27 percent, the study said.

You may be interested

Honduran opposition protesters take to the streets
Central America
784 views
Central America
784 views

Honduran opposition protesters take to the streets

Noe Leiva / AFP - December 15, 2017

Supporters of the leftist opposition in Honduras blocked streets in various cities around that country on Friday, despite political repression,…

Of snow, kindness and Northern Lights: a Costa Rican in Manitoba, Canada
Please Send Coffee!
1871 views
Please Send Coffee!
1871 views

Of snow, kindness and Northern Lights: a Costa Rican in Manitoba, Canada

Gustavo Díaz Cruz - December 14, 2017

My mom named me Gustavo Adolfo. I was born in Puntarenas, next to the sea, but my home was in…

Response to disaster: aid successes, struggles in post-Maria Puerto Rico
Weather
1422 views
Weather
1422 views

Response to disaster: aid successes, struggles in post-Maria Puerto Rico

John McPhaul - December 13, 2017

As Costa Rica joins many other nations in looking back upon the horrendous 2017 hurricane season, longtime Tico Times contributor…