Joint Costa Rica-U.S. drug patrol nabs boat with 725 kilos of cocaine

September 4, 2012

The Costa Rican Coast Guard seized at least 725 kilograms of cocaine in a joint operation with the U.S. Coast Guard codenamed Operation Caribbean. 

The vessel ran aground in northeastern Costa Rica, in the province of Limón, after being spotted by a U.S. aircraft, which notified the Costa Rican Coast Guard. The Costa Rican ships pursued the traffickers to Barra del Colorado, along the Caribbean coast. Four suspected traffickers abandoned their vessel and escaped to the region’s dense mountains.

Officials also detected the presence of a semi-submersible vessel, believed to be used by traffickers to transport drugs in the region.

In a press conference, Public Security Minister Mario Zamora indicated the search for the crew members would continue, and that 40 police officers are searching for the men. They are working with four airplanes, a helicopter and Coast Guard ships.

National Police Director Juan José Andrade said that 150 more officers will join the search.

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