Strong winds cause nearly 400 damage reports

March 7, 2012

Some 700 National Power and Light Company (CNFL) employees have been working since Wednesday morning to restore power in three areas of San José where power lines were damaged by winds of up to 80 kph blowing since yesterday in the Central Valley.

CNFL support lines had received 393 damage reports as of Wednesday from different parts of the capital.

“There are three major sectors affected: San Antonio de Escazú (in the west), San José de la Montaña (in Heredia to the north) and Jericó (in Desamparados to the south). Also, there were three reports of fallen electrical posts,” said Fructuoso Garrido, director of distribution for CNFL.

Windy conditions will continue today and tomorrow “due to a significant increase in an air pressure system over the Caribbean Sea,” said Rebecca Morera, a meteorologist with the National Meteorological Institute (IMN).

These winds are the strongest in 13 years, according to IMN records.

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