Manuel Antonio/Quepos Tidings

January 11, 2012

The Costa Rican Electricity Institute (ICE) and Kids Saving the Rainforest (KSTR) met recently in Quepos to review the environmental hazards of the electrical lines in our area. People from both organizations attended and shared all environmental work done during 2011, with the objective of reducing electrocutions of animals (monkeys, sloths, birds and others) and planning for 2012. KSTR reported fewer electrocutions last year, so the teamwork is making a difference.

ICE emphasized the work done in the Parador area, isolating the mounting points and other structures of the electric distribution lines with equipment specifically designed to minimize risk of death for animals that make contact with the wires. This work, which has a cost of about ₡7 million ($14,000), represents not only an environmentally friendly option but also a significant improvement in the quality and continuity of electrical service, because it will mean fewer outages due to electrocutions. 

–Jennifer Rice, 

jennifer@kidssavingtherainforest.org

& Anita Myketuk, labuenanotacr@gmail.com

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