Trade Traffic for Music At National Theater

May 1, 2014

The Culture Ministry and the National Theater suggest a new way to beat the tiresome traffic that clogs the streets every evening as people leave work: Skip it and listen to some beautiful chamber music.

The “Música al Atardecer” (“Music at Dusk”) program kicked off last Thursday with a concert by Costa Rican pianist Manuel Matarrita, offering a calming respite for those tired commuters who would rather avoid the rush-hour traffic.

The theme is to “Change rush hour into an hour of music,” a statement from the National Theater said.

At 5 p.m. every Thursday, 45-minute concerts will be held in the National Theater’s beautifully adorned upstairs foyer.

The next show, set for Aug. 27, is a tribute to Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos, 50 years after his death.

Tickets are available at the theater’s box office from Monday through Saturday for an affordable ¢1,000 (about $1.70).

The foyer can host only 150 audience members, so the National Theater recommends buying tickets early. For more information, call 2221-5341 or visit www.teatronational.go.cr.

–Daniel Shea

 

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