Taxi, Bus Fares Motor South

March 6, 2009

That taxi ride across town will be a little bit cheaper next week.

Costa Rica’s Public Services Regulatory Authority (ARESEP) approved on Tuesday a resolution to cut fares by ¢40 ($0.07) colones for the first kilometer and ¢45 ($0.08) for each additional kilometer, which will take effect March 10.

ARESEP spokeswoman Carolina Mora said the reduction reflected a six-month decline in fuel costs.

Taxi rides will now cost ¢430 ($0.77) for the first kilometer, with additional kilometers costing ¢385 ($0.69). Waiting fares, however, will increase to ¢2,505 ($4.47) from ¢2,470 ($4.41), per hour. The cuts apply to all of the country’s 12,000-plus taxis.

The changes have left some taxistas seeing red.

“What can we do? Work a few hours more?” said taxi driver Arnunfo Montoya, 67, from San José, who estimated he would have work 14 to 15 hours per day after the rate cut, up from a 10 to 12 hour workday now.

The rate change comes on the heels of a 5 percent cut in bus fares, set to take effect today (Friday). The reductions, which range between ¢10 ($0.02) and ¢360 ($0.64) depending on route, mark the first general bus fare cut in 10 years.

–Patrick Fitzgerald,

Holly Sonneland

 

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