Costa Rica to see electricity bill rise 15 percent

December 24, 2008

The Public Services Regulatory Authority, ARESEP, approved a 15 percent raise in electricity rates that would take effect in January.

The Costa Rican Electricity Institute (ICE) originally requested late last month a hike of more than 40 percent, citing operating costs and the need to guarantee the purchase of geothermal fuel as the main reasons.

ICE also mentioned preventing blackouts during the upcoming warm months as another reason to increase electricity rates next month.

For a family that spends about ¢25,000 (about $46) a month in electricity, the increase would amount to about ¢4,280 ($8), according to ARESEP.

About 90 percent of the energy generated comes from renewable sources, such as water, geothermal, wind and biomass, which allow the country to have more favorable prices in the energy sector compared to other Central American nations.

It is estimated that for 2009, inflation would be about 10 percent and the colón would lose 4.5 percent of its value. Those factors, ICE said, increase the cost of operations.

You may be interested

Honduran opposition protesters take to the streets
Central America
1125 views
Central America
1125 views

Honduran opposition protesters take to the streets

Noe Leiva / AFP - December 15, 2017

Supporters of the leftist opposition in Honduras blocked streets in various cities around that country on Friday, despite political repression,…

Of snow, kindness and Northern Lights: a Costa Rican in Manitoba, Canada
Please Send Coffee!
2150 views
Please Send Coffee!
2150 views

Of snow, kindness and Northern Lights: a Costa Rican in Manitoba, Canada

Gustavo Díaz Cruz - December 14, 2017

My mom named me Gustavo Adolfo. I was born in Puntarenas, next to the sea, but my home was in…

Response to disaster: aid successes, struggles in post-Maria Puerto Rico
Weather
1495 views
Weather
1495 views

Response to disaster: aid successes, struggles in post-Maria Puerto Rico

John McPhaul - December 13, 2017

As Costa Rica joins many other nations in looking back upon the horrendous 2017 hurricane season, longtime Tico Times contributor…