Water-Lily Paper Could Help Lake, Community

July 9, 2004

THE rapidly growing water lily iscausing serious problems in the Cachíreservoir, in the Orosi Valley east of SanJosé. But it could soon be a source of revenuefor residents of the area, who havebeen affected by an agricultural crisis,according to the Technology Institute ofCosta Rica (ITCR).The institute is promoting technologythat uses fibers from the lily to makepaper and cardboard.The aquatic plants cover 172 hectaresof the reservoir, and produce 150 metrictons daily, according to the institute.The institute is helping train smallbusinesses in the area in the manufacturingof water-lily paper. So far, 60 communityleaders have expressed interest,according to the institute.An agreement between ITCR and theCosta Rican Electricity Institute (ICE) hasallowed a loan of 30,000 square meters ofthe reservoir for 30 years for the extraction,processing and storage of water lily.The production of water-lily productswill not only provide jobs in processing,but also through related small businesses,which can focus on the design, packagingand commercialization of such products,the institute said

Facebook Comments

You may be interested

Tico Times Shade: What does ‘middle class’ mean in Costa Rica?
Tico Times Shade
45 views
Tico Times Shade
45 views

Tico Times Shade: What does ‘middle class’ mean in Costa Rica?

Alejandro Zúñiga - October 18, 2018

It’s not often The Tico Times writes an explainer about basic Costa Rican daily living that’s equally surprising to a…

Costa Rica grants asylum to Nicaraguan activist Alvaro Leiva
News
333 views
News
333 views

Costa Rica grants asylum to Nicaraguan activist Alvaro Leiva

AFP - October 18, 2018

Costa Rica granted the Nicaraguan human rights activist Alvaro Leiva political asylum last week. Leiva is the secretary of the…

Gardeners of the forest: The tapir in Costa Rica
Pic of the Day
423 views
Pic of the Day
423 views

Gardeners of the forest: The tapir in Costa Rica

Alissa Grosskopf - October 18, 2018

Nai Conservation seeks to protect the endangered danta, or tapir, from growing human intervention. “We formed a collective: we believe…